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Tsunami enabled hundreds of aquatic species to raft across Pacific

The 2011 Japanese tsunami set the stage for something unprecedented. For the first time in recorded history, scientists have detected entire communities of coastal species crossing the ocean by floating on makeshift rafts. Nearly 300 species have appeared on the shores of Hawaii and the US West Coast attached to tsunami debris, marine biologists discovered.

Bed bugs attracted to dirty laundry

Bed bugs are attracted to dirty laundry, according to new research.

Modern humans emerged more than 300,000 years ago new study suggests

A genomic analysis of ancient human remains from KwaZulu-Natal revealed that southern Africa has an important role to play in writing the history of humankind.

Supersonic gas streams left over from the Big Bang drive massive black hole formation

A super-computer simulation by an international team of researchers has shown the formation of a rapidly growing star from supersonic gas streams in the early universe left over from the Big Bang. The star ends its life with catastrophic collapse to leave a black hole with a mass of 34,000 times that of the Sun.

Perovskite solar cells reach record long-term stability, efficiency over 20 percent

Scientists have greatly improved the operational stability of perovskite solar cells by introducing cuprous thiocyanate protected by a thin layer of reduced graphene oxide. Devices lost less than 5 percent performance when subjected to a crucial accelerated aging test during which they were exposed for more than 1,000 hours to full sunlight at 60°C.

Mosquito gut bacteria may offer clues to malaria control

Mosquitoes harbor gut bacteria just like people do—and the bugs inside the bugs may hold a key to fighting malaria.

FDA OKs Device With No Finger-Prick For Diabetes

Device eliminates need to prick finger to measure blood sugar levels

TV-gadget maker Roku's stock soars after IPO raises $219M

Shares of Roku, an early player in streaming-video gadgets, soared Thursday after its initial public offering of stock raised $219 million.

China's Baidu, police crack down on 'rumours'

Chinese internet giant Baidu has teamed up with the country's cyber police to control the spread of rumors and fake news, the company said Thursday, as authorities continue to tighten censorship ahead a major Communist Party congress next month.

Database of earthquakes triggered by human activity is growing—with some surprises

The Human-Induced Earthquake Database (HiQuake), the world's most complete database of earthquake sequences proposed to have been triggered by human activity, now includes approximately 730 entries, according to a report published October 4 in the "Data Mine" column of the journal Seismological Research Letters.

Continental controls needed to maintain fightback against tree diseases

Tighter controls on timber and plant movements into Europe are necessary to prevent further disastrous effects of plant diseases, a new study of the ash-dieback pathogen advises.

Team builds flexible new platform for high-performance electronics

A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has created the most functional flexible transistor in the world—and with it, a fast, simple and inexpensive fabrication process that's easily scalable to the commercial level.

Gadgets: Nothing to sneeze at! Desktop device monitors indoor air quality.

I recently tested the Awair, Air Quality Monitor, which tracks the five key factors of air quality including chemicals such as volatile organic compounds, carbon dioxide, dust, humidity, and temperature. A lot of the chemicals are in standard products we use for cleaning, and beauty products.

'Lost Continent' Rises Again With New Expedition

Tens of millions of years after it disappeared under the waters of the Pacific Ocean, scientists have completed the first explorations of what some scientists are calling a hidden continent. From a report: During a two-month ocean voyage this summer, a team of more than 30 scientists from 12 countries explored the submerged landmass of Zealandia on an advanced research vessel and collected samples from the seabed. Scientists were able to drill into the ocean floor at depths of more than 4,000 feet, collecting more than 8,000 feet of sediment cores that provides a window into 70 million years of geologic history, reports Georgie Burgess for ABC News. More than 8,000 fossils from hundreds of species were also collected in the drilling, giving scientists a glimpse at terrestrial life that lived tens of millions of years ago in the area. "The discovery of microscopic shells of organisms that lived in warm shallow seas, and of spores and pollen from land plants, reveal that the geography and climate of Zealandia were dramatically different in the past," expedition leader Gerald Dickens said in a statement.

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