A holodeck for flies, fish and mice

How do people orient themselves when they are in a new area? How do we use street signs or houses, for instance, to estimate the distance we have traveled? Put simply: how do we update our mental map? Neuroscientists have been studying such questions in animals to learn about the basic principles of spatial cognition. "Until now, we have envied an invention from the world of science fiction: a holodeck like they have in Star Trek," says Prof. Dr. Andrew Straw. The holodeck is a space which can simulate any desired virtual world. "Something like the holodeck from Star Trek would enable key experiments in which we could artificially decouple an animal's movement from its perception," says the Freiburg professor of biology. Together with his colleague Prof. Dr. Kristin Tessmar-Raible from the Max F. Perutz Laboratories, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and Medical University of Vienna, Austria, and an international team, Straw has constructed a kind of holodeck and with it created new opportunities for researching spatial cognition. The animals perceived the simulated objects as real and changed their behavior in different visual environments. The research team describes its results in the Nature Methods journal.

First integrated atlas of microRNA expression in human primary cells

The human body consists of hundreds of different cell types with very different functions and behaviors, despite the fact that the genome sequence of almost all cells of an individual person is identical. The variation in functional roles of cells is accomplished by an intricate regulatory network consisting of regulatory proteins as well as regulatory RNAs such as microRNAs. Dysregulation of such networks plays a major role in disease development, in particular in cancer.

University of Texas removes four Confederate statues

The monuments are symbols of "modern white supremacy and neo-Nazism", the school's president says.

Eclipse data used to create musical composition

Researchers have created an original music composition for Monday's eclipse. They uses drums, synthesized tones and other sounds to symbolize the movements of the sun and moon and the gradual darkness they will produce during the August 21 event.

Still trying to make sense of Nick Kyrgios

Still trying to make sense of Nick Kyrgios

Better odor recognition in odour-colour synesthesia

People who see colors while perceiving smells are better at distinguishing between different smells and different colors, and are better at naming odors, compared to a group without synesthesia.

Overcoming the last line of antibiotic resistance against bacterial infections

A recent study presents a comprehensive overview of S. aureus' remarkable resilience against our body's immune system and how to better protect against deadly infections, with implications for overcoming antibiotic resistance.

Our brains do change from early to mid-adulthood

Scientists have been able to accurately estimate an individual's age from their brain structure. The researchers found that significant microstructural changes occur in the brain from early to mid-adulthood. Until now, scientists thought that brain structure was relatively stable during this period of life, and this is one of the first studies to show that our brains continue to change throughout our early and mid-adulthood.

Before the flood: What drives preparedness?

A new study across Austria, England, and Romania finds room for improvement in both public and private schemes that could help encourage risk reduction behaviors and reduce losses in future disasters.

Asia’s universities inching up world rankings

Some universities are approaching the top 20, their success partly down to ‘brain gain’ and research investment.

UK promises to prosecute online hate crimes vigorously

British authorities are promising to prosecute hate crimes committed online as vigorously as those that take place face-to-face, recognizing the growth of hate speech on social media and the potential for such crimes to affect large numbers of people.

Apple Looks For Exceptional Engineer With a Secret Job Posting

An anonymous reader writes: A hidden Apple website that hosts a job description and invitation to apply for an important position has recently been discovered. The posting describes a role that should be filled by a "talented engineer" who will develop a critical infrastructure component for the company's ecosystem. Discovered late yesterday by ZDNet's Zach Whittaker, the secret posting was found at us-west-1.blobstore.apple.com (now pulled). The posting stated how critical the role is, the scale of the work, key qualifications, and a description of the type of employee Apple is looking for.

Post-whaling recovery of Southern Hemisphere

By 2100 some Southern Hemisphere whale species will not have reached half their pre-whaling numbers, while other species are expected to recover by 2050.The findings are part of new CSIRO and UQ research, which looks at the interaction of historical whaling, food availability and future climate changes to predict whale numbers to 2100.

Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other's actions 

Copying the behaviour of others makes us effective learners and allow skills, knowledge and inventions to be passed on from one generation to the next. Imitation is therefore viewed as the key cognitive ability that enabled human culture to grow and create such things as language, technology, art and science. Decades of research has shown that apes, in spite of their proverbial aping abilities, are rather poor imitators, especially when compared to human children. The imitative superiority of children has been attributed to a higher social motivation to engage others in communication and the sharing of experiences. Current theories hold that apes are worse imitators because they lack this social and communicative side of imitation. The studies behind these theories, however, have focused on imitation in the area of learning solutions to physical problems.

'Lost city' used 500 years of soil erosion to benefit crop farming

Researchers at the University of York working on a 700-year old abandoned agricultural site in Tanzania have shown that soil erosion benefited farming practices for some 500 years.

Secret Service Broke Due to Trump's Expenses

The Secret Service can no longer pay hundreds of agents it needs to carry out an expanded protective mission -- in large part due to the sheer size of President Trump's family and efforts necessary to secure their multiple residences up and down the East Coast. Secret Service Director Randolph "Tex" Alles, in an interview with USA TODAY, said more than 1,000 agents have already hit the federally mandated caps for salary and overtime allowances that were meant to last the entire year.

Cold-tolerant yeast strains for cider and wine makers to improve product quality

The new cold-tolerant hybrid strains developed by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland enable fermentation at lower and higher temperatures than before. Production at lower temperature reduces the risk of contamination and possibly allows reduction of the use of sulphates. Modulating temperatures can be used to fine-tune product aroma.

So far, Blair Walsh's comeback bid with Seahawks is right on track

So far, Blair Walsh's comeback bid with Seahawks is right on track

Don Meredith's son to tell the story of the 'First Cowboys'

Don Meredith's son to tell the story of the 'First Cowboys'

Panthers' Cam Newton, solar eclipse 'trending up' in Charlotte

Panthers' Cam Newton, solar eclipse 'trending up' in Charlotte

Biochemical 'fingerprints' reveal diabetes progression

Researchers describe a new method to study biochemical changes that occur in the pancreas during the development of diabetes. The method is based on molecular spectroscopy and can be used to extract biochemical profiles (or 'fingerprints') containing information about disease progression. The method could facilitate improved understanding of the mechanistic processes on molecular and cellular levels that are key to the development of diabetes.

Physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transition

Researchers probe a mysterious phase transition in an organic molecular conductor using synchrotron X-ray radiation.

Tampering FAQ: How will NBA respond to Pacers' charges against Lakers?

Tampering FAQ: How will NBA respond to Pacers' charges against Lakers?

Chronic stress induces fatal organ dysfunctions via a new neural circuit

New research reveals the mechanisms behind the effects of chronic stress and tiny inflammations in the brain on fatal gut failure.

'Lost city' used 500 years of soil erosion to benefit crop farming

Researchers working on a 700-year-old abandoned agricultural site in Tanzania have shown that soil erosion benefited farming practices for some 500 years.

Many young cancer patients do not receive adequate fertility information and support

All cancer patients of reproductive age should be provided with fertility information and referrals for fertility preservation, researchers urge.

Helping robots correct errors on-the-fly and learn from each other

New stochastic separation theorems have demonstrated how mathematicians could enhance capabilities of artificial intelligence.

Newly developed nomograms provide accurate predictions for patients with oropharyngeal cancer

Researchers recently developed and validated a nomogram that can predict 2-year and 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with local-regionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) treated primarily with radiation-based therapy.

Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other's actions

Decades of research has shown that apes, in spite of their proverbial aping abilities, are rather poor imitators, especially when compared to human children. Current theories hold that apes are worse imitators because they lack this social and communicative side of imitation. A new study has instead targeted the interactive side of imitation directly, and finds that the divide between humans and chimpanzees is less clear cut.

Syndicate content
Mensmopolitan is a global news and entertainment expose providing a pleasurable flow of content fit for gentleman and lady, alike.

18d3877f0f6811b39525a6afe0693c1d